Dozens feared dead after truck plows into Bastille Day crowd in Nice, France

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The Bastille Day celebration in Nice, France was shattered late Thursday evening when a truck plowed into a crowd, injuring scores and possibly resulting in multiple deaths. 

Though there’s been no official tally of deaths announced, the mayor of Nice sent a tweet saying it’s possible “tens” are dead. 

According to Nice-Matin, a French newspaper, the incident occurred just after 10 p.m., just after a fireworks display. 

Videos and images shared on social media reveal a chaotic scene with other celebrants rushing away from the scene and seeking shelter in nearby restaurants.  Read more…

More about Terror, France, Nice, and World

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The Bastille Day celebration in Nice, France was shattered late Thursday evening when a truck plowed into a crowd, injuring scores and possibly resulting in multiple deaths. 

Though there’s been no official tally of deaths announced, the mayor of Nice sent a tweet saying it’s possible “tens” are dead. 

According to Nice-Matin, a French newspaper, the incident occurred just after 10 p.m., just after a fireworks display. 

Videos and images shared on social media reveal a chaotic scene with other celebrants rushing away from the scene and seeking shelter in nearby restaurants.  Read more…

More about Terror, France, Nice, and World

Zoom.ai believes an automated assistant is the fix for a weighty workload

IMG_9087 Zoom.ai wants to give managers and others in enterprise a gift that has a very high value in business: Time. Company founder Roy Pereira told me at Montreal’s Startupfest that while tools are making us more productive, we’re also expected to handle more, and that’s causing a growing problem his startup hopes to address with AI.
The startup, just six months old, is part of… Read More

IMG_9087 Zoom.ai wants to give managers and others in enterprise a gift that has a very high value in business: Time. Company founder Roy Pereira told me at Montreal’s Startupfest that while tools are making us more productive, we’re also expected to handle more, and that’s causing a growing problem his startup hopes to address with AI.
The startup, just six months old, is part of… Read More

Relive the best ‘Call of Duty’ with a look at the ‘Modern Warfare’ remaster

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Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered takes an amazing game and spruces it up for 2016.

This look at “Crew Expendable,” the game’s first mission, made its debut at E3 (Electronic Entertainment Expo)Remastered is a ground-up reworking of the 2007 game, which really doesn’t show its age in this video. 

The game won’t be sold on its own, but you’ll be able to get it as a bonus with the purchase of either the Legacy, Digital Deluxe or Legacy Pro editions of Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare.

If you’re looking for something to compare the above video to, check out a playthrough of the original game’s mission in the video below. Read more…

More about Activision, Esports, Entertainment, Gaming, and Call Of Duty Modern Warfare Remastered

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Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered takes an amazing game and spruces it up for 2016.

This look at “Crew Expendable,” the game’s first mission, made its debut at E3 (Electronic Entertainment Expo)Remastered is a ground-up reworking of the 2007 game, which really doesn’t show its age in this video. 

The game won’t be sold on its own, but you’ll be able to get it as a bonus with the purchase of either the Legacy, Digital Deluxe or Legacy Pro editions of Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare.

If you’re looking for something to compare the above video to, check out a playthrough of the original game’s mission in the video below. Read more…

More about Activision, Esports, Entertainment, Gaming, and Call Of Duty Modern Warfare Remastered

A Park Beneath New York City’s Sidewalks

The city has given a green light to the subterranean Lowline in a former trolley tunnel.

Dan Barasch envisions verdant gardens below New York City’s concrete and asphalt. He pictures locals parading down flights of stairs to be confronted by stalagmites of ferns, bromeliads, and mosses in sunken spaces flooded with light.

It surely sounds fantastical, but New York City is one step closer to a year-round subterranean park now that the Lowline, a one-acre underground green space, has received a preliminary go-ahead from city officials.

On Wednesday, the city’s Economic Development Corporation designated the Lowline as the developer approved to work on plans for the decommissioned trolley terminal beneath the Williamsburg Bridge.

During the early 20th century, the site was a turnaround point for trolleys, but has been disused since 1948. In the interim, the space above ground has transformed into one of the densest pockets in a city already strapped for space. Barasch, the Lowline’s co-founder and executive director, wondered what might happen if developers built down, instead of up.

To prove the premise—an underground park sustained by light siphoned from the sidewalks—Barasch and his collaborators set up a prototype in a former warehouse space two blocks north of the park’s prospective future home. In the Lowline Lab, sunlight streams from a solar canopy mounted above 3,000 plants, including fruit that flourishes with no regard for the season. Inside, there were plump strawberries ready to be picked in March; a rambling mint patch was overgrown in the middle of December. The result, says Barasch, is a pleasantly puzzling sense of being completely immersed in a botanic garden in the midst of an urban area.

It’s hard to deny the project’s whoa factor, but supporters say that its utility stretches beyond a novelty experiment. “My first reaction was a combination of, ‘wow, that is the craziest thing I have ever heard,’ combined with ‘what if they can actually do it?’” says Alicia Glen, the deputy mayor for housing and economic development. Glen views this project as a prospective model for other imaginative ways of revitalizing overlooked patches of public space—especially in neighborhoods such as the Lower East Side, where, she adds, “there isn’t much space to claim.” Zany ideas like this, she says, could be key to reactivating vast networks of often-invisible structures that are all but forgotten. “We are so cramped,” she says. “We owe it to ourselves to turn over a new leaf.”

A photo posted by lowlinenyc (@lowlinenyc) on

Still, New York magazine reported that some transit enthusiasts have wondered if the space should be re-commissioned as a thoroughfare for trains or buses. Meanwhile, a handful of locals have expressed concerns that the project is destined to draw the same tourist crowds that sometimes choke the High Line, the green space topping a 1.45-mile-long elevated train track on the city’s western edge.

To Glen, these concerns are trumped by the project’s potential to, for all intents and purposes, accrete square footage that seemed non-existent. “We’re not taking something from some other purpose and having a debate over how to use that land,” she says. “We’ve created another acre of parkland where no one ever thought there could be one.”

But before the project can move forward, the creators will need respond to any public concerns by convening presentations, hosting site tours, and speaking before the local community board, which pledged support last December. This process “is like getting a blessing of the community,” says Stephanie Báez, the vice president of public affairs at the New York City Economic Development Corporation. “If they get a thumbs-up from everyone, that’s another check in the box,” she adds. The team will also have 12 months to drum up $10 million in backing, and draw schematics that outline the sustainable mechanisms that will keep the project afloat.

Barasch says that the underground space bears traces of its former life; cobblestones and cables remain fixed to the floor and ceiling. “It’s like a fossil in amber,” he says. The solar technology, Barasch adds, could transform the space from a relic to chimera. By directing light down into the tunnel—similar to a magnifying glass throwing light—“we deliver this futuristic technology that invigorates the space and makes it like something completely unknown,” he says.

Glen wants to throw her weight behind the momentum that the project has already generated through programs in its temporary space. There, the creators have welcomed 70,000 visitors since October 2015; Glen views its success as a testament to the project’s viability. “The plants are alive—they’re growing,” she says. Moving forward, she adds, perhaps more fantastical ideas can serve as launchpads for surprising urban activations. “We’re open for business for other crazy ideas.”

‘Call of Duty’ pros vie for championship spots this weekend

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This weekend, teams from across the globe will battle for a chance to compete in the Call of Duty World Championship in September. 

Stage 2 of the Pro Division of the Call of Duty World League competition is set to play out from July 14-17.

Regional showdowns in North America, Europe and Australia/New Zealand will decide who wins how much from the Stage 2 prize pool. The top 12 teams will also secure a berth in the upcoming Call of Duty World Championship in Los Angeles, which will stage matches between 32 qualifying teams during Labor Day weekend.

More about Activision, Treyarch, Entertainment, Gaming, and Esports

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This weekend, teams from across the globe will battle for a chance to compete in the Call of Duty World Championship in September. 

Stage 2 of the Pro Division of the Call of Duty World League competition is set to play out from July 14-17.

Regional showdowns in North America, Europe and Australia/New Zealand will decide who wins how much from the Stage 2 prize pool. The top 12 teams will also secure a berth in the upcoming Call of Duty World Championship in Los Angeles, which will stage matches between 32 qualifying teams during Labor Day weekend.

More about Activision, Treyarch, Entertainment, Gaming, and Esports

Autopilot was off when Tesla Model X in Pennsylvania crashed

Tesla Autopilot The Tesla Model X that crashed in Pennsylvania on July 1 had autopilot disabled at the time, Elon Musk announced on Twitter. This info comes straight from the vehicle’s own logs. Read More

Tesla Autopilot The Tesla Model X that crashed in Pennsylvania on July 1 had autopilot disabled at the time, Elon Musk announced on Twitter. This info comes straight from the vehicle’s own logs. Read More

The internet tells Trump his rumored VP choice sucks

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The rumors are flying that Donald Trump has picked his running mate and the internet is having a field day. 

Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, may (as in, this is not confirmed) pick Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his vice presidential running mate at some point on Thursday or Friday, with the official announcement scheduled for 11 a.m. ET in New York City. 

Pence stepped onto the national stage last year when he signed a bill into law that opened the door to Indiana businesses potentially discriminating against LGBT customers. 

More about Muslim Ban, Tpp, Trade, Iraq War, and Campaign

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The rumors are flying that Donald Trump has picked his running mate and the internet is having a field day. 

Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, may (as in, this is not confirmed) pick Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his vice presidential running mate at some point on Thursday or Friday, with the official announcement scheduled for 11 a.m. ET in New York City. 

Pence stepped onto the national stage last year when he signed a bill into law that opened the door to Indiana businesses potentially discriminating against LGBT customers. 

More about Muslim Ban, Tpp, Trade, Iraq War, and Campaign

Itty-bitty Nintendo NES with 30 built-in games coming in November

nes

Today, Nintendo announced the NES Classic Edition, a little console loaded with 30 classic titles, including Super Mario Bros., The Legend of Zelda, Metroid, Donkey Kong, and Kirby’s Adventure. It plugs into your TV’s HDMI port and includes one NES gamepad controller. It’s coming November 11 and retails for $60.

Included titles:

  • Balloon Fight
  • Bubble Bobble
  • Castlevania
  • Castlevania II: Simon’s Quest
  • Donkey Kong
  • Donkey Kong Jr.
  • Double Dragon II: The Revenge
  • Dr. Mario
  • Excitebike
  • Final Fantasy
  • Galaga
  • Ghosts’N Goblins
  • Gradius
  • Ice Climber
  • Kid Icarus
  • Kirby’s Adventure
  • Mario Bros.
  • Mega Man 2
  • Metroid
  • Ninja Gaiden
  • Pac-Man
  • Punch-Out!! Featuring Mr. Dream
  • StarTropics
  • Super C
  • Super Mario Bros.
  • Super Mario Bros. 2
  • Super Mario Bros. 3
  • Tecmo Bowl
  • The Legend of Zelda
  • Zelda II: The Adventure of Link

[via]

(Thanks, Calvin!)

nes

Today, Nintendo announced the NES Classic Edition, a little console loaded with 30 classic titles, including Super Mario Bros., The Legend of Zelda, Metroid, Donkey Kong, and Kirby’s Adventure. It plugs into your TV’s HDMI port and includes one NES gamepad controller. It’s coming November 11 and retails for $60.

Included titles:

  • Balloon Fight
  • Bubble Bobble
  • Castlevania
  • Castlevania II: Simon’s Quest
  • Donkey Kong
  • Donkey Kong Jr.
  • Double Dragon II: The Revenge
  • Dr. Mario
  • Excitebike
  • Final Fantasy
  • Galaga
  • Ghosts’N Goblins
  • Gradius
  • Ice Climber
  • Kid Icarus
  • Kirby’s Adventure
  • Mario Bros.
  • Mega Man 2
  • Metroid
  • Ninja Gaiden
  • Pac-Man
  • Punch-Out!! Featuring Mr. Dream
  • StarTropics
  • Super C
  • Super Mario Bros.
  • Super Mario Bros. 2
  • Super Mario Bros. 3
  • Tecmo Bowl
  • The Legend of Zelda
  • Zelda II: The Adventure of Link

[via]

(Thanks, Calvin!)

The true story of history’s only known meteorite victim

AL.com: "A photo of Ann Hodges in 1954 shows the bruise left on her upper thigh after she was struck by a meteorite in Sylacauga, Ala. "(Alabama Museum of Natural History)

One afternoon in 1954 Ann Hodges of Alabama was napping on her couch when a meteorite the size of a software came through the ceiling, bounced off a radio and hit her in the thigh. She escaped with a giant bruise, but the meteorite inflicted much harsher damage in an unexpected way. The Air Force took the meteorite. Hodges and her husband Eugene fought to get it back, but their landlord, Birdie Guy, said the meteorite belonged to her and she sued to get it back. She settled with the Hodges, taking $500 in exchange for the rock.

From National Geographic:

Ann later suffered a nervous breakdown, and in 1964 she and Eugene separated. She died in 1972 at 52 of kidney failure at a Sylacaugan nursing home.

Eugene suspects the meteorite and frenzy that followed had taken its toll on Ann. He said “she never did recover,” according to the museum.

From Slate:

That rock, even at the time, was worth a fortune. To give you an idea, a second piece was found not far away by a farmer on his property. He was able to sell it and buy a new house and a car. And his piece was less than half the mass of the Hodges chunk, with less notoriety as well. Were something like that to happen today, the meteorite would sell for a lot of money.

Hodges’ legal problems were so great that her mental and physical health suffered. She and her husband divorced, and she died of kidney failure in 1972 at the relatively young age of 52. It’s easy to wonder how much the event led to her decline.

The meteorite now resides at the Alabama Museum of Natural History in Tuscaloosa.

AL.com: "A photo of Ann Hodges in 1954 shows the bruise left on her upper thigh after she was struck by a meteorite in Sylacauga, Ala. "(Alabama Museum of Natural History)

One afternoon in 1954 Ann Hodges of Alabama was napping on her couch when a meteorite the size of a software came through the ceiling, bounced off a radio and hit her in the thigh. She escaped with a giant bruise, but the meteorite inflicted much harsher damage in an unexpected way. The Air Force took the meteorite. Hodges and her husband Eugene fought to get it back, but their landlord, Birdie Guy, said the meteorite belonged to her and she sued to get it back. She settled with the Hodges, taking $500 in exchange for the rock.

From National Geographic:

Ann later suffered a nervous breakdown, and in 1964 she and Eugene separated. She died in 1972 at 52 of kidney failure at a Sylacaugan nursing home.

Eugene suspects the meteorite and frenzy that followed had taken its toll on Ann. He said “she never did recover,” according to the museum.

From Slate:

That rock, even at the time, was worth a fortune. To give you an idea, a second piece was found not far away by a farmer on his property. He was able to sell it and buy a new house and a car. And his piece was less than half the mass of the Hodges chunk, with less notoriety as well. Were something like that to happen today, the meteorite would sell for a lot of money.

Hodges’ legal problems were so great that her mental and physical health suffered. She and her husband divorced, and she died of kidney failure in 1972 at the relatively young age of 52. It’s easy to wonder how much the event led to her decline.

The meteorite now resides at the Alabama Museum of Natural History in Tuscaloosa.

Why all of us need to be futurists

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Two weeks ago, pioneering futurist Alvin Toffler died. Over at Medium, my colleague Marina Gorbis, executive director of Institute for the Future, reflects on Toffler’s vision and why it’s more important than ever for futures thinking to be a massively public endeavor. Marina writes:



Disorientation. Irrationality. Malaise. These were the sensations that in 1965 famed futurist Alvin Toffler, who died two weeks ago, suggested would run rampant in the face of the “revolutionary transitions” facing our society. According to Toffler, we would all suffer from a condition not unlike the culture shock experienced by travelers to foreign countries. He called it “future shock.”

“Imagine not merely an individual but an entire society — including its weakest, least intelligent, and most traditional members — suddenly transported into this new world,” Toffler wrote in a Horizon magazine article titled “The Future as a Way of Life.” “The result is mass disorientation, future shock on a grand scale.”


Arguably, we are living Toffler’s future today. Many of us are in a state of shock as social media enables the rise of political figures who we could never imagine as viable presidential candidates, software eats people’s jobs (according to some), massive data leaks allow loosely organized networks of journalists to uncover stories of global crime and corruption, and surveys consistently point to the loss of trust in most institutions across the globe. We are quick to marvel at Toffler’s foresight. I would argue, however, that our “future shock” is highly unevenly distributed….


We need to make futures thinking a way of life for more people outside of the enclaves like Silicon Valley, corporate boardrooms, and academic think tanks. To accomplish that, we must distribute the tools of futures thinking and futures-making more widely. Envisioning and making the future must be a massively public endeavor.

The Future as a Way of Life: Alvin Toffler’s Unfinished Business

1*I9rKiQ0ZVnH_KWQlEDvPyg


Two weeks ago, pioneering futurist Alvin Toffler died. Over at Medium, my colleague Marina Gorbis, executive director of Institute for the Future, reflects on Toffler’s vision and why it’s more important than ever for futures thinking to be a massively public endeavor. Marina writes:



Disorientation. Irrationality. Malaise. These were the sensations that in 1965 famed futurist Alvin Toffler, who died two weeks ago, suggested would run rampant in the face of the “revolutionary transitions” facing our society. According to Toffler, we would all suffer from a condition not unlike the culture shock experienced by travelers to foreign countries. He called it “future shock.”

“Imagine not merely an individual but an entire society — including its weakest, least intelligent, and most traditional members — suddenly transported into this new world,” Toffler wrote in a Horizon magazine article titled “The Future as a Way of Life.” “The result is mass disorientation, future shock on a grand scale.”


Arguably, we are living Toffler’s future today. Many of us are in a state of shock as social media enables the rise of political figures who we could never imagine as viable presidential candidates, software eats people’s jobs (according to some), massive data leaks allow loosely organized networks of journalists to uncover stories of global crime and corruption, and surveys consistently point to the loss of trust in most institutions across the globe. We are quick to marvel at Toffler’s foresight. I would argue, however, that our “future shock” is highly unevenly distributed….


We need to make futures thinking a way of life for more people outside of the enclaves like Silicon Valley, corporate boardrooms, and academic think tanks. To accomplish that, we must distribute the tools of futures thinking and futures-making more widely. Envisioning and making the future must be a massively public endeavor.

The Future as a Way of Life: Alvin Toffler’s Unfinished Business